Home / English Posts (page 8)

English Posts

Radioactive Decay Time Measurement

The exact moment when an unstable atom will decay into a more stable is considered random and unpredictable. What can you do, given a sample of a particular isotope, it is to note that the number of decays follows a precise statistical law.

Read More »

Radon

Radon is a chemical element with symbol Rn and atomic number 86. It is a radioactive, colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas, occurring naturally as a decay product of radium.

Read More »

Energy Resolution in Gamma Spectrometry

The absorption of the gamma ray inside the scintillation crystal and the production of photo-electrons inside the PMT are essentially random processes, thus the Poisson and Gaussian statistical distribution could be applied to explain the broadening of the lines.

Read More »

Tritium

Tritium, (symbol T, 3H or H-3 also known as hydrogen-3) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. The nucleus of tritium (sometimes called a triton) contains one proton and two neutrons, whereas the nucleus of protium (by far the most abundant hydrogen isotope) contains one proton and no neutrons. Naturally occurring tritium is extremely rare on Earth, where trace amounts are formed by …

Read More »

Compton Scattering

Compton scattering is the inelastic scattering of a photon by a quasi-free charged particle, usually an electron. It results in a decrease in energy (increase in wavelength) of the photon (which may be an X-ray or gamma ray photon), called the Compton effect. Part of the energy of the photon is transferred to the recoiling electron.

Read More »

Thorium Gamma Spectrometry

Thorium is a chemical element with symbol Th and atomic number 90. A radioactive actinide metal, thorium is one of only three radioactive elements that still occurs in quantity in nature as a primordial element (the other two being bismuth and uranium).

Read More »

Uranium Gamma Spectrometry

Uranium is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92. It is a silvery-white metal in the actinide series of the periodic table. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium is weakly radioactive because all its isotopes are unstable (with half-lives of the 6 naturally known isotopes, uranium-233 to uranium-238, varying between 69 years and 4.5 billion years).

Read More »

DIY Gamma Spectrometry

Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the quantitative study of the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources, in such as the nuclear industry, geochemical investigation, and astrophysics. Most radioactive sources produce gamma rays, which are of various energies and intensities. When these emissions are detected and analyzed with a spectroscopy system, a gamma-ray energy spectrum can be produced.

Read More »

Cosmic Ray Muons & Muon Lifetime

The aim of this project is to detect the muon decay events and to measure the muon mean lifetime. For this purpose we will use the scintillation detector described in the following post : Scintillation Detector for Cosmic Muons.

Read More »